Patriotic Nonprofit (U.S. 2017)

Updated April 3rd: The Scott Catalogue number for this issue is 5172.

Updated January 27th: Here is the pictorial first-day postmark for this issue: It measures 2.36” x 1.40″.

Updated January 18th:
On February 10, 2017, in Fort Lauderdale, FL, the U.S. Postal Service will issue the Patriotic Nonprofit nondenominated, nonprofit organization stamp (5-cent value), in one design, in a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) coil of 3,000 stamps (Item 755100), and a PSA coil of 10,000 stamps (Item 760200).

The stamp will go on sale nationwide February 10, 2017.

Patriotic Nonprofit, the new nondenominated, nonprofit-price stamp, showcases the letters “USA” in blue, accompanied by a bright red star on a white background with a blue border. To create the new design, the 2016 USA stamp art was rendered slightly smaller to accommodate the blue border. Intended for bulk mailings by authorized nonprofit organizations, this stamp will be issued in coils of 3,000 and 10,000 stamps. Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the stamp with Leslie Badani.

Item 755100 Patriotic Nonprofit (Nondenominated priced at 5 cents) PSA Coil of 3,000
Item 760200 Patriotic Nonprofit (Nondenominated priced at 5 cents) PSA Coil of 10,000

Stamp Fulfillment Services will not make an automatic push distribution to Post Offices.

How to Order the First-Day-of-Issue Postmark:
Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. Each cover must have sufficient postage to meet First-Class Mail requirements. They may purchase new stamps at their local Post Office, at The Postal Store website at http://www.usps.com/shop, or by calling 800-782-6724. They should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes (to themselves or others), and place them in a larger envelope addressed to:

FDOI – Patriotic Nonprofit Stamp
USPS Stamp Fulfillment Services
8300 NE Underground Drive, Suite 300
Kansas City, MO 64144-9900

After applying the first-day-of-issue postmark, the Postal Service will return the envelopes through the mail. There is no charge for the postmark up to a quantity of 50. There is a 5-cent charge for each additional postmark over 50. All orders must be postmarked by April 10, 2017.

There are no philatelic products for the coil of 3,000 stamps.
There is one philatelic product for the coil of 10,000 stamps:

  • 760216 First-Day Cover, $0.98

Technical Specifications – Coil of 3,000:

Issue: Patriotic Nonprofit Stamp
Item Number: 755100
Denomination & Type of Issue: Nondenominated Nonprofit (5-cent value)
Format: Coil of 3,000, 1 design
Series: N/A
Issue Date & City: February 10, 2017, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310
Art Director: Antonio Alcalá, Alexandria, VA
Designer: Antonio Alcalá, Alexandria, VA
Designer: Leslie Badani, Alexandria, VA
Typographer: Antonio Alcalá, Alexandria, VA
Typographer: Leslie Badani, Alexandria, VA
Modeler: Joseph Sheeran
Manufacturing Process: Offset, Microprint – USPS
Printer: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Printed at: Williamsville, NY
Press Type: Muller A76
Stamps per Coil: 3,000
Print Quantity: 105,000,000 stamps
Paper Type: Nonphosphored Type III
Adhesive Type: Pressure-sensitive
Processed at: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Colors: PMS 286 Blue C, PMS 199 Red C, PMS 429 Grey C
Stamp Orientation: Vertical
Image Area (w x h): 0.73 x 0.84 in/18.54 x 21.34 mm
Stamp Size (w x h): 0.87 x 0.98 in/22.10 x 24.89 mm
Plate Size: 594 stamps per revolution
Plate Numbers: “P” followed by three (3) single digits
Coil Number Frequency: Plate numbers every 27th stamp below stamp image

Technical Specifications – Coil of 10,000:

Issue: Patriotic Nonprofit Stamp
Item Number: 760200
Denomination & Type of Issue: Nondenominated Nonprofit (5-cent value)
Format: Coil of 10,000, 1 design
Series: N/A
Issue Date & City: February 10, 2017, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310
Art Director: Antonio Alcalá, Alexandria, VA
Designer: Antonio Alcalá, Alexandria, VA
Designer: Leslie Badani, Alexandria, VA
Typographer: Antonio Alcalá, Alexandria, VA
Typographer: Leslie Badani, Alexandria, VA
Modeler: Joseph Sheeran
Manufacturing Process: Offset, Microprint – USPS
Printer: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Printed at: Williamsville, NY
Press Type: Muller A76
Stamps per Coil: 10,000
Print Quantity: 2,000,000,000 stamps
Paper Type: Nonphosphored Type III
Adhesive Type: Pressure-sensitive
Processed at: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Colors: PMS 286 Blue C, PMS 199 Red C, PMS 429 Grey C
Stamp Orientation: Vertical
Image Area (w x h): 0.73 x 0.84 in/18.54 x 21.34 mm
Stamp Size (w x h): 0.87 x 0.98 in/22.10 x 24.89 mm
Plate Size: 594 stamps per revolution
Plate Numbers: “P” followed by three (3) single digits
Coil Number Frequency: Plate numbers every 27th stamp below stamp image

Updated January 5th: This stamp will be issued February 10th in Fort Lauderdale, FL. The ASDA is holding a stamp show there that day.

from the USPS December 28, 2016:

Patriotic Nonprofit, the new non-denominated, nonprofit-price stamp, showcases the letters “USA” in blue, accompanied by a bright red star on a white background with a blue border. To create the new design, the 2016 USA stamp art was rendered slightly smaller to accommodate the blue border. Intended for bulk mailings by authorized nonprofit organizations, this stamp will be issued in coils of 10,000. Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the 2017 Patriotic Nonprofit stamp using the 2016 USA stamp art he designed with Leslie Badani.

Gateway Arch (Priority Mail Express) (U.S. 2017)

March 11th: The Scott catalogue number for this issue is 5157.

Updated January 27th: Here is the digital color postmark for this issue: It measures 2.98 x 1.4 inches.

Updated January 18th:
On January 22, 2017, in Kansas City, MO, the U.S. Postal Service will issue the $23.75 Gateway Arch Priority Mail Express stamp, in one design, in a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) pane of 4 stamps (Item 111300).

The stamp will go on sale nationwide January 22, 2017.

The U.S. Postal Service celebrates the Gateway Arch, in St. Louis, Missouri, with a new Priority Mail Express stamp. The Gateway Arch was built as a memorial to President Thomas Jefferson and the 19th-century traders and pioneers for whom St. Louis was the gateway to the West. The stamp art depicts the majestic stainless-steel arch at sunset in its setting on the banks of the Mississippi River. Towering above the city’s skyline, the Gateway Arch is reflected in the rippling water below, where a barge passes by. Designed by art director Greg Breeding, the stamp features a digital illustration created by Dan Cosgrove.

Stamp Fulfillment Services will make an automatic push distribution to Post Offices of a quantity to cover approximately 30 days of sales.

How to Order the First-Day-of-Issue Postmark:
Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at their local Post Office, at The Postal Store website at http://www.usps.com/shop, or by calling 800-782-6724. They should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes (to themselves or others), and place them in a larger envelope addressed to:

FDOI – Gateway Arch Stamp
USPS Stamp Fulfillment Services
8300 NE Underground Drive, Suite 300
Kansas City, MO 64144-9900

After applying the first-day-of-issue postmark, the Postal Service will return the envelopes through the mail. There is no charge for the postmark up to a quantity of 50. There is a 5-cent charge for each additional postmark over 50. All orders must be postmarked by March 22, 2017.

There are two philatelic products for this stamp issue:

  • 111316 First-Day Cover, $24.19
  • 111321 Digital Color Postmark, $24.90

Technical Specifications:

Issue: Gateway Arch Stamp
Item Number: 111300
Denomination & Type of Issue: $23.75 Priority Mail Express Rate
Format: Pane of 4 (1 design)
Series: N/A
Issue Date & City: January 22, 2017, Kansas City, MO 64108
Art Director: Greg Breeding, Charlottesville, VA
Designer: Greg Breeding, Charlottesville, VA
Typographer: Dan Cosgrove, Chicago, IL
Artist: Dan Cosgrove, Chicago, IL
Modeler: Joseph Sheeran
Manufacturing Process: Offset, Microprint
Printer: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Printed at: Williamsville, NY
Press Type: Stevens, Vari-Size Security Press
Stamps per Pane: 4
Print Quantity: 3,000,000 stamps
Paper Type: Nonphosphored Type III, Block Tag Applied
Adhesive Type: Pressure-sensitive
Processed at: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Colors: Black, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow
Stamp Orientation: Horizontal
Image Area (w x h): 1.42 x 1.085 in/36.07 x 27.56 mm
Overall Size (w x h): 1.56 x 1.225 in/39.62 x 31.12 mm
Full Pane Size (w x h): 4.12 x 3.45 in/104.65 x 87.63 mm
Plate Size: 20 stamps per revolution
Plate Numbers: “P” followed by four (4) digits
Marginal Markings:
Front: Plate number in two corners of pane
Back: ©2016 USPS • USPS Logo • Four barcodes (111300) • Plate Position Diagram • Promotional Text

Updated January 5th: This stamp will be issued Sunday, January 22nd with no ceremony and a Kansas City, MO, postmark.

from the USPS December 28, 2016:

The Postal Service celebrates the Gateway Arch, in St. Louis, MO, with a new Priority Mail Express stamp. The Gateway Arch was built as a memorial to President Thomas Jefferson and the 19th-century traders and pioneers for whom St. Louis was the gateway to the West. The stamp art depicts the majestic stainless-steel arch at sunset in its setting on the banks of the Mississippi River. Towering above the city’s skyline, the Gateway Arch is reflected in the rippling water below, where a barge passes by. Designed by art director Greg Breeding, the stamp features a digital illustration created by Dan Cosgrove.

Lili’uokalani Gardens (Priority Mail) (U.S. 2017)

Updated March 11th: The Scott catalogue number for this issue is 5156.

Updated January 27th: Here is the digital color postmark for this issue: It measures 2.91″ x 1.39″.

Updated January 18th: From the USPS:

A special ceremony for the Lili’uokalani Gardens Priority Mail stamp will be held Monday, Jan. 23, at 11:00 a.m. at the Shoroan Tea House, Lili’uokalani Gardens in Hilo.

Hilo Postmaster Alton Uyetake, Hawaii County Managing Director Wil Okabe and Friends of the Lili’uokalani Gardens President K.T. Cannon-Eger will participate in the ceremony to unveil an enlargement of the stamp.

While this is not a First-Day-of-Issue ceremony, stamp sales and cancellations will take place.

Also:

On January 22, 2017, in Kansas City, MO, the U.S. Postal Service will issue the $6.65 Lili’uokalani Gardens Priority Mail stamp, in one design, in a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) pane of 4 stamps (Item 119900).

The stamp will go on sale nationwide January 22, 2017.

The U.S. Postal Service issues this Priority Mail stamp to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Lili‘uokalani Gardens in Hilo, Hawaii. Built on land donated by Queen Lili‘uokalani (1838–1917), the last Hawaiian monarch to govern the islands, the gardens were dedicated in 1917 and named in her honor. The stamp art features one of the gardens‘ most iconic structures, the red wooden shelter on a stone bridge spanning a portion of the pond. The bridge is surrounded by three of the gardens’ stone lanterns and lush tropical plants. Art director Greg Breeding designed the stamp with original art by Dan Cosgrove.

Stamp Fulfillment Services will make an automatic push distribution to Post Offices of a quantity to cover approximately 30 days of sales.

How to Order the First-Day-of-Issue Postmark:
Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at their local Post Office, at The Postal Store website at http://www.usps.com/shop, or by calling 800-782-6724. They should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes (to themselves or others), and place them in a larger envelope addressed to:

FDOI – Lili’uokalani Gardens Stamp
USPS Stamp Fulfillment Services
8300 NE Underground Drive, Suite 300
Kansas City, MO 64144-9900

After applying the first-day-of-issue postmark, the Postal Service will return the envelopes through the mail. There is no charge for the postmark up to a quantity of 50. There is a 5-cent charge for each additional postmark over 50. All orders must be postmarked by March 22, 2017.

There are two philatelic products for this stamp issue:

  • 119916 First-Day Cover, $7.09
  • 119921 Digital Color Postmark, $7.80

Technical Specifications:

Issue: Lili’uokalani Gardens Stamp
Item Number: 119900
Denomination & Type of Issue: $6.65 Priority Mail Rate
Format: Pane of 4 (1 design)
Series: N/A
Issue Date & City: January 22, 2017, Kansas City, MO 64108
Art Director: Greg Breeding, Charlottesville, VA
Designer: Greg Breeding, Charlottesville, VA
Typographer: Dan Cosgrove, Chicago, IL
Artist: Dan Cosgrove, Chicago, IL
Modeler: Joseph Sheeran
Manufacturing Process: Offset, Microprint
Printer: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Printed at: Williamsville, NY
Press Type: Stevens, Vari-Size Security Press
Stamps per Pane: 4
Print Quantity: 12,000,000 stamps
Paper Type: Nonphosphored Type III, Block Tag Applied
Adhesive Type: Pressure-sensitive
Processed at: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Colors: Black, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow
Stamp Orientation: Horizontal
Image Area (w x h): 1.42 x 1.085 in/36.07 x 27.56 mm
Overall Size (w x h): 1.56 x 1.225 in/39.62 x 31.12 mm
Full Pane Size (w x h): 4.12 x 3.45 in/104.65 x 87.63 mm
Plate Size: 20 stamps per revolution
Plate Numbers: “P” followed by four (4) digits
Marginal Markings:
Front: Plate number in two corners of pane
Back: ©2016 USPS • USPS Logo • Four barcodes (119900) • Plate Position Diagram • Promotional Text

Updated January 5th: This stamp will be issued Sunday, January 22nd with no ceremony and a Kansas City, MO, postmark.

from the USPS December 28, 2016:

This Priority Mail stamp is being issued to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Lili’uokalani Gardens in Hilo, Hawai’i. Built on land donated by Queen Lili’uokalani (1838–1917), the last Hawaiian monarch to govern the islands, the gardens were dedicated in 1917 and named in her honor. Hilo’s Lili’uokalani Gardens are Japanese in style with influences of Hawaiian remains of lava flows, plantings of tropical trees and flowers, and a view of the Mauna Kea volcano — Hawai’i’s highest point. The stamp art features one of the gardens’ most iconic structures, the red wooden shelter on a stone bridge spanning a portion of the pond. The bridge is surrounded by three stone lanterns and lush tropical plants. Art director Greg Breeding designed the stamp with original art by Dan Cosgrove.

Azulillo stamped card (U.S. 2017)

Updated July 7th:
On August 11, 2017, in Independence, OH, the U.S. Postal Service® will issue the Azulillo stamped card Forever® priced at 38 cents (34-cent postage + 4-cent surcharge) in one design.

The U.S. Postal Service issues the Azulillo stamped card for 2017 featuring an illustration of a Chilean blue crocus (Tecophilaea cyanocrocus) from pre-existing artwork by famed illustrator and designer Dugald Stermer (1936-2011). His penciled calligraphy under the flower indicates one of its common names, azulillo, which loosely translated from Spanish means “little blue thing,” with its botanical name above. Art director Ethel Kessler designed the stamped card.

The Azulillo stamped card will be available in the following formats:

  • Single-cut cards (Item 250000)
  • Double-reply cards (Item 250400)
  • Sheet of 40 cards (Item 250500)

Stamp Fulfillment Services will not make an automatic push distribution to Post Offices

How to Order the First-Day-of-Issue Postmark:
Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at their local Post Office, at The Postal Store® website at usps.com/shop, or by calling 800-782-6724. They must affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes (to themselves or others), and place them in a larger envelope addressed to:

FDOI – Azulillo Stamped Card
USPS Stamp Fulfillment Services
8300 NE Underground Drive, Suite 300
Kansas City, MO 64144-9900

After applying the first-day-of-issue postmark, the Postal Service will return the envelopes through the mail. There is no charge for the postmark up to a quantity of 50. There is a 5-cent charge for each additional postmark over 50. All orders must be postmarked by October 11, 2017.

Philatelic products for the stamped cards are as follows:
Single-cut

  • 250016 First-Day Cover, $0.50

Double-reply

  • 250416 First-Day Cover, $0.88

Technical Specifications:

Issue: Azulillo Stamped Card
Item Number: 250000
Denomination & Type of Issue: Forever Stamped Card Rate
Format: Single-cut Card
Series: N/A
Issue Date & City: August 11, 2017, Independence, OH 44131
Art Director: Ethel Kessler, Bethesda, MD
Designer: Ethel Kessler, Bethesda, MD
Typographer: Ethel Kessler, Bethesda, MD
Existing Art: Dugald Stermer
Modeler: Joseph Sheeran
Manufacturing Process: Offset, Microprint
Printer: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Printed at: Williamsville, NY
Press Type: Heidelberg, Speedmaster
Print Quantity: 3,840,000 stamped cards

Technical Specifications:

Issue: Azulillo Stamped Card
Item Number: 250400
Denomination & Type of Issue: Forever Stamped Card Rate
Format: Double-reply Card
Series: N/A
Issue Date & City: August 11, 2017, Independence, OH 44131
Art Director: Ethel Kessler, Bethesda, MD
Designer: Ethel Kessler, Bethesda, MD
Typographer: Ethel Kessler, Bethesda, MD
Existing Art: Dugald Stermer
Modeler: Joseph Sheeran
Manufacturing Process: Offset, Microprint
Printer: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Printed at: Williamsville, NY
Press Type: Muller A76
Print Quantity: 288,000 double-cut cards
Paper Type: Nonphosphored Type III, Block Tag applied
Adhesive Type: N/A
Processed at: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Colors: Black, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow
Image Orientation: Horizontal
Card Size (w x h): 5.5 x 7.0 in/139.70 x 177.80 mm
Plate Size: 12 cards per revolution
Plate Numbers: N/A
Marginal Markings: ©2016 USPS • Recycling Logo
Paper Type: Nonphosphored Type III, Block Tag applied
Adhesive Type: N/A
Processed at: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Colors: Black, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow
Image Orientation: Horizontal
Card Size (w x h): 5.5 x 3.5 in/139.70 x 88.90 mm
Plate Size: 40 cards per revolution
Plate Numbers: N/A
Marginal Markings: ©2016 USPS • Recycling Logo

Technical Specifications:

Issue: Azulillo Stamped Card
Item Number: 250500
Denomination & Type of Issue: Forever Stamped Card Rate
Format: Sheet of 40 Cards
Series: N/A
Issue Date & City: August 11, 2017, Independence, OH 44131
Art Director: Ethel Kessler, Bethesda, MD
Designer: Ethel Kessler, Bethesda, MD
Typographer: Ethel Kessler, Bethesda, MD
Existing Art: Dugald Stermer
Modeler: Joseph Sheeran
Manufacturing Process: Offset, Microprint
Printer: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Printed at: Williamsville, NY
Press Type: Heidelberg, Speedmaster
Print Quantity: 4,000 sheets of 40 cards
Paper Type: Nonphosphored Type III, Block Tag applied
Adhesive Type: N/A
Processed at: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Colors: Black, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow
Image Orientation: Horizontal
Card Size (w x h): 5.5 x 3.5 in/139.70 x 88.90 mm
Plate Size: 40 cards per revolution
Plate Numbers: N/A
Marginal Markings: ©2016 USPS • Recycling Logo

Updated July 6th: There is a pictorial B&W first-day postmark for this issue: It measures 2.9″ x 1.12″. In addition, there will also be a show pictorial for Americover.

Updated March 13th: The USPS says this stamped card will be issued August 11 in Independence, Ohio. That would coincide with the first day of Americover 2017, the annual show and convention of the American First Day Cover Society.

from the USPS December 28, 2016:

The U.S. Postal Service issues a new stamped card for 2017 featuring an illustration of a Chilean blue crocus (Tecophilaea cyanocrocus) from pre-existing artwork by illustrator and designer Dugald Stermer (1936–2011). His penciled calligraphy under the flower indicates one of its common names azulillo — loosely translated from Spanish, it means “little blue thing”— with its botanical name above. The Chilean blue crocus is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture zones seven to nine. It generally flowers in February or March in North America. Art director Ethel Kessler designed the stamped card.

Oscar de la Renta (U.S. 2017)

Updated April 3rd: The Scott Catalogue numbers for this issue are

5173 Oscar de la Renta pane of 11
a. (49¢) Photograph of Oscar de la Renta
b. (49¢) Bright pink and gray fabric pattern
c. (49¢) Green dress
d. (49¢) Black and white fabric pattern
e. (49¢) Red dress
f. (49¢) Floral fabric pattern with dull green background
g. (49¢) Blue dress
h. (49¢) Floral fabric pattern with white background
i. (49¢) Yellow dress
j. (49¢) Pink, white and gray floral fabric pattern
k. (49¢) Pink dress

Updated February 17: The copyright date in the Technical Specifications was incorrect (“2017” rather than “2016”). It has been corrected below.

Updated February 1st:
Here is the design for the Digital Color Postmark: It measures 3″ x 1.3″. Here is the design for the pictorial cancel: It measures 2.97″ x 1.14″. There is also a “special” postmark that local post offices may offer: It measures 2.87″ x .98″.

Updated January 27th:
[press release]
Oscar de la Renta Forever Stamp Set to Take Center Stage
Feb. 16 Ceremony at Vanderbilt Hall in Grand Central Terminal in New York City

What:
The U.S. Postal Service is issuing the Oscar de la Renta Forever stamp to honor one of the world’s leading fashion designers. For 50 years, Oscar de la Renta created glamorous, sophisticated clothes that showcased the distinctively feminine attributes of the women who wore them. His innovative designs and close attention to detail elevated American style and brought international attention to New York as a world leader in fashion.
The stamp art includes 11 images — an evocative black-and-white portrait of de la Renta and 10 details from some of his most exquisite gowns.

Who:
Secretary Hillary Clinton
Anna Wintour, artistic director of Condé Nast and editor in chief of Vogue
Janice D. Walker, vice president, Corporate Communications, U.S. Postal Service
Alexander L. Bolen, chief executive officer, Oscar de la Renta, LLC.
Anderson Cooper, journalist and author

When:
Friday, Feb. 16, 2017, 11:00 a.m.

Where:
Vanderbilt Hall East at
Grand Central Terminal
New York, N.Y.
(Note: There will be no autographing session.)

Background:
In 1956, 24-year-old Oscar de la Renta achieved his first success as a fashion designer. The wife of the U.S. Ambassador to Spain commissioned de la Renta to make a white debutante dress for her daughter. Later that year, she appeared on the cover of Life wearing the dress. Shortly thereafter, he began working in the Madrid atelier of legendary Spanish designer Cristobal Balenciaga. De la Renta learned how to work with complex fabric, studied proportions, perfected draping techniques, and gained an understanding of garment construction.

After later breaking into haute couture fashion in Paris, de la Renta moved to New York and began working at Elizabeth Arden in 1963. Two years later, he debuted his own collection for the first time. A rising star along Seventh Avenue, he captured the beauty and ease American women craved in their gowns and suits. He mingled just as confidently with the socialites of New York as he had in Paris and Madrid and sought to create both the day and evening wear that such powerful and influential women desired. With his highly polished style and tremendous skill, de la Renta bridged the gap between American and French fashion.

His clothes reflected the duality of the American woman—feminine without looking fragile, authoritative yet still refined. He also had a talent for maintaining a timeless yet modern quality in his pieces, incorporating elements of popular culture and other societal trends. His garments were regularly featured on the covers of high fashion magazines and became glorious indulgences found in specialty stores around the country. His designs continue to represent the sophistication and international quality of fashion in the United States.

Art director Derry Noyes designed the stamps. Oscar de la Renta portrait photo by Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin. Photo of light pink dress by Norman Jean Roy.

The Oscar de la Renta stamps are being issued as Forever stamps. These Forever stamps are always equal in value to the current First-Class Mail 1-ounce price.

Updated January 18th:
On February 16, 2017, in New York, NY, the U.S. Postal Service will issue the Oscar de la Renta First-Class Mail stamps (Forever priced at 49 cents) in eleven designs, in a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) pane of 11 stamps (Item 562700). The Oscar de la Renta $5.39 pane of 11 stamps may not be split, and the stamps may not be sold individually.

The stamps will go on sale nationwide February 16, 2017.

Most widely known for dressing the country’s first ladies and celebrities, Oscar de la Renta (1932–2014) was one of the world’s leading fashion designers for 50 years. This pane of 11 stamps features an evocative black-and-white portrait of the couturier and 10 details from several of his most exquisite gowns. De la Renta‘s innovative designs and close attention to detail elevated American style and brought international attention to New York as a world leader in fashion. Art director Derry Noyes designed the stamps.

Stamp Fulfillment Services will not make an automatic push distribution to Post Offices.

How to Order the First-Day-of-Issue Postmark:
Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at their local Post Office, at The Postal Store website at www.usps.com/shop, or by calling 800-782-6724. They should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes (to themselves or others), and place them in a larger envelope addressed to:

FDOI – Oscar de la Renta Stamps
USPS Stamp Fulfillment Services
8300 NE Underground Drive, Suite 300
Kansas City, MO 64144-9900

After applying the first-day-of-issue postmark, the Postal Service will return the envelopes through the mail. There is no charge for the postmark up to a quantity of 50. There is a 5-cent charge for each additional postmark over 50. All orders must be postmarked by April 16, 2017.

There are six philatelic products for this stamp issue:

  • 562706 Press Sheet with Die-cut, $48.51
  • 562710 Digital Color Postmark Keepsake (2 panes), $12.95
  • 562716 First-Day Cover (set of 11), $10.23
  • 562721 Digital Color Postmark (set of 11), $18.04
  • 562724 Framed Art, $39.95
  • 562730 Ceremony Program, $6.95

Technical Specifications:

Issue: Oscar de la Renta Stamps
Item Number: 562700
Denomination & Type of Issue: First Class Mail Forever
Format: Pane of 11 (11 designs)
Series: N/A
Issue Date & City: February 16, 2017, New York, NY 10199
Art Director: Derry Noyes
Designer: Derry Noyes
Typographer: Derry Noyes
Artist: From existing photos
Modeler: Joseph Sheeran
Manufacturing Process: Offset
Printer: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Printed at: Williamsville, NY
Press Type: Muller A76
Stamps per Pane: 11
Print Quantity: 17,600,000 stamps
Paper Type: Nonphosphored Type III, Block Tag
Adhesive Type: Pressure-sensitive
Processed at: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. (APU)
Colors: Black, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow
Stamp Orientation: Vertical
Image Area (w x h): 1.09 x 1.04 in/27.56 x 36.07 mm
Overall Size (w x h): 1.23 x 1.56 in/31.12 x 39.62 mm
Full Pane Size (w x h): 7.64 x 8.63 in/194.06 x 219.20 mm
Plate Size: 99 stamps per revolution
Plate Numbers: “P” followed by four (4) digits
Marginal Markings:
Front: Header: Oscar de la Renta
Back: ©2016 USPS • USPS Logo • Barcode (562700) •Oscar de la Renta • Promotional Text

Updated January 5th: These stamps will be issued February 16th in New York City.

from the USPS December 28, 2016:

Most widely known for dressing the nation’s first ladies and celebrities, Oscar de la Renta (1932–2014) was one of the world’s leading fashion designers for more than 50 years. This pane of 11 stamps features an evocative black-and-white portrait of the couturier and 10 details from several of his most exquisite gowns. De la Renta’s innovative designs and close attention to detail are said to have elevated American style and brought international attention to New York as a world leader in fashion. Art director Derry Noyes designed the stamps. Oscar de la Renta portrait photo by Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin. Photo of light pink gown by Norman Jean Roy.

5 More U.S. 2017 Issues Announced

[press release] [click on the issue name to go to that issue’s page]
Additional 2017 Stamps Announced
Renowned fashion designer Oscar de la Renta, St. Louis’ Gateway Arch Featured

WASHINGTON — The Postal Service today announced more stamps to be issued in 2017. “The new year is shaping up to be exceptional as the Postal Service continues to produce stamps that celebrate the people, events and cultural milestones that are unique to the history of our great nation,” said Mary-Anne Penner, U.S. Postal Service Director, Stamp Services. “We are very excited to showcase these miniature works of art to help continue telling America’s story as we add to the lineup of 2017 stamps announced earlier.”

Here are the newest additions:

Oscar de la Renta
Most widely known for dressing the nation’s first ladies and celebrities, Oscar de la Renta (1932–2014) was one of the world’s leading fashion designers for more than 50 years. This pane of 11 stamps features an evocative black-and-white portrait of the couturier and 10 details from several of his most exquisite gowns. De la Renta’s innovative designs and close attention to detail are said to have elevated American style and brought international attention to New York as a world leader in fashion. Art director Derry Noyes designed the stamps. Oscar de la Renta portrait photo by Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin. Photo of light pink gown by Norman Jean Roy.

Azulillo (stamped card)
The U.S. Postal Service issues a new stamped card for 2017 featuring an illustration of a Chilean blue crocus (Tecophilaea cyanocrocus) from pre-existing artwork by illustrator and designer Dugald Stermer (1936–2011). His penciled calligraphy under the flower indicates one of its common names azulillo — loosely translated from Spanish, it means “little blue thing”— with its botanical name above. The Chilean blue crocus is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture zones seven to nine. It generally flowers in February or March in North America. Art director Ethel Kessler designed the stamped card.

Lili’uokalani Gardens (Priority Mail)
This Priority Mail stamp is being issued to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Lili’uokalani Gardens in Hilo, Hawai’i. Built on land donated by Queen Lili’uokalani (1838–1917), the last Hawaiian monarch to govern the islands, the gardens were dedicated in 1917 and named in her honor. Hilo’s Lili’uokalani Gardens are Japanese in style with influences of Hawaiian remains of lava flows, plantings of tropical trees and flowers, and a view of the Mauna Kea volcano — Hawai’i’s highest point. The stamp art features one of the gardens’ most iconic structures, the red wooden shelter on a stone bridge spanning a portion of the pond. The bridge is surrounded by three stone lanterns and lush tropical plants. Art director Greg Breeding designed the stamp with original art by Dan Cosgrove.

Gateway Arch (Priority Mail Express)
The Postal Service celebrates the Gateway Arch, in St. Louis, MO, with a new Priority Mail Express stamp. The Gateway Arch was built as a memorial to President Thomas Jefferson and the 19th-century traders and pioneers for whom St. Louis was the gateway to the West. The stamp art depicts the majestic stainless-steel arch at sunset in its setting on the banks of the Mississippi River. Towering above the city’s skyline, the Gateway Arch is reflected in the rippling water below, where a barge passes by. Designed by art director Greg Breeding, the stamp features a digital illustration created by Dan Cosgrove.

Patriotic Nonprofit
Patriotic Nonprofit, the new non-denominated, nonprofit-price stamp, showcases the letters “USA” in blue, accompanied by a bright red star on a white background with a blue border. To create the new design, the 2016 USA stamp art was rendered slightly smaller to accommodate the blue border. Intended for bulk mailings by authorized nonprofit organizations, this stamp will be issued in coils of 10,000. Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the 2017 Patriotic Nonprofit stamp using the 2016 USA stamp art he designed with Leslie Badani.

“Deep CSAC” vs. 2017 U.S.

by Lloyd A. de Vries

In February 2014, someone leaked to The Washington Post a list of the stamps and postal stationery subjects the U.S. Postal Service and its Citizens Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC) was considering. The list was nicknamed “Deep CSAC.”

The list was divided into three categories: Design Approved, In Design Development, and Not Yet In Design.

At first, the U.S. stamp program hewed fairly closely to Deep CSAC, but as time went on, it diverged more and more: Some stamps were issued in a different year than the list had indicated, some weren’t issued at all, and some were issued that weren’t on the list. Still, looking at the list now, it’s amazing how accurate it was. (It’s still online.)

The list didn’t specifically cover 2017, but several of the issues on the 2017 list so far are there (Barn Swallow envelope, Love Skywriting, “Garden Beauty” (likely Flowers from the Garden in 2017), Christmas Carols. And I expect we’ll add to this list as 2017’s list of issues is completed.

So what is on the list, so far unissued but “design approved,” could be a guide to other 2017 issues.

Although two somewhat non-religious Christmas subjects have been announced for 2017 (Christmas Carols and “A Snowy Day”), there is no religious issue. The USPS has been issuing Madonna & Child stamps in alternate years, and just issued one in 2016, but a design by Francesco Bachiacca has been approved. According to Wikipedia, he was a Renaissance artist. His Madonna and Child with St. John hangs in the Dallas Museum of Art.

However, there are also three other “Madonna and Child” stamps with designs approved.

Elizabeth Taylor was rumored to be the Legends of Hollywood pick for 2016; instead, it was Shirley Temple. Deep CSAC has a design “in development.” Entertainment celebrity stamps often become mired in rights issues, from the estates of the celebrities themselves to use of photographs and characters portrayed in the design. She had children with Michael Wilding and Michael Todd, and an adopted daughter with Eddie Fisher and Richard Burton. At least three of the children are still alive. She also has nine grandchildren. We have seen how children from different spouses or partners often disagree on stamp issuances.

We’ve been hearing for years that “Science Fiction Writers” was an imminent issue, a set of 4 or 5 stamps first rumored for 2013. According to the Deep CSAC list, the design is approved, and there is even a second second in the works. There is probably at least one rights issue with the initial set.

There was also strong rumors last year about stamps for Steve Jobs and a Music Icons one for James Brown. We know there are major rights issues for Brown; his heirs can’t even agree on where to bury him. I could easily see a rights issue with the Apple founder, too.

Speaking of Music Icons, the secret list says a design has been approved for Roy Orbison.

We’ve had Distinguished Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, and almost annual service medal stamps in the past few years. Deep CSAC indicates a Distinguished Airmen design is approved. Soldiers, Sailors and Marines were all four stamps.

No two-ounce Distinguished Americans stamp has been announced. Deep CSAC says there is a two-ounce-rate design for A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., an African American federal judge.

However, don’t rush out and order your first day cover cachets or prints suitable to framing or book travel based on this speculation. Several of 2017’s announced issues don’t show up anywhere on the Deep CSAC list. Several of 2016’s weren’t there either.

Hotchner: Collecting American Flags

Dealing With American Flags
by John M. Hotchner

With the presidential election behind us and the inauguration coming up, we are seeing the American Flag as the backdrop of much TV reporting. It got me wondering what might be found in the pantheon of American stamp issues that might make for an interesting way to give more depth to U.S. collecting. There is certainly nothing wrong with the traditional approach of collecting one of every U.S. stamp issued. And yet for many of us, new challenges beckon, and U.S. Flags is one that comes with a high level of knowledge, enthusiasm, and even offers a way to connect with non-collectors who have a love for America and its symbols.

With the 1963 5¢ Flag Over White House (Scott #1208, right) issue, the U.S. Postal Service began an unbroken run of definitive (regular postage) stamps that extends to today. This movement really got into high gear with the issuance of the first plate number coil (18¢) Flag stamps in 1981. One of the post-1963 definitives (Scott #1891) is shown below.

In the 1990s, the U.S. Postal Service contracted out the printing of more and more definitives to the private sector, and multiple printers were needed to produce the multiple billions of Flag stamps needed by the public. Ultimately, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) got out of printing U.S. stamps altogether in 2005. Multiple printers meant not just different plate numbers, but many different versions of each issue including: lick-and-stick, self-stick, tagging varieties, separation (perforation and die cut) varieties, print dates in the lower left corner, microprinting entries, slight design differences, and counting numbers on the back. Most of this is reflected in increasingly complex Scott U.S. Specialized Catalogue listings.

There is enough variety in the modern issues since the 1990s that there are collectors specializing in a single definitive issue. I might also mention that there is the allied area of counterfeits that can be added. As the USPS transitioned from engraved designs to photogravure-produced designs, the incidence of credible postal counterfeits has gone up exponentially; and enforcement of the anti-counterfeiting statutes became a huge challenge. Today, armed with an ultraviolet detector, those collectors with access to quantities of modern definitives can find postal counterfeits easily because most are not tagged; and those that are, aren’t tagged properly. It seems that replicating the tagging is much more difficult and expensive for the criminal class than replicating the design!

But I digress. There are many older U.S. stamps showing representations of the flag, even though the earliest examples show the flag in monocolor. Let’s look at some of them.

To the extent we think about it, most U.S. collectors would assume that the 30¢ 1869 stamp (Scott #121 at right) is the first issue with a U.S. flag. See the all-blue flags in the lower corners of the stamp? In fact, if one includes representations of the flag in the form of a shield, then the first U.S. stamp is the 30¢ Benjamin Franklin 1860 stamp (Scott #38). Note the stars-and-stripes shields in all four corners (below left).  Had you ever noticed it before?

Would you like to guess how many face-different U.S. stamp designs include the various forms of the American flag? 25? 50? As many as 100? When I sat down with the catalogue to count them, I was surprised to tally over 200! Now, that does include denominated and non-denominated flag stamps that are otherwise the same, and the different color denominations of the 32¢ “G” definitives; but it does not include Stars-and-Stripes shields, or hard-to-identify dots flying from flag poles on federal buildings and ships, on monuments, uniforms, and airplanes.

The first U.S. flag to be shown in color is the handsome 4¢ 1957 48-star flag (Scott #1094) shown on the right. The 1957 stamp also has the distinction of being the first U.S. stamp to be produced on the BEP’s new Giori press, which could do up to three colors from a single plate. Up to that point, multicolor stamps produced by BEP required separate plates for each color; a situation that required more time and effort, but also made the Bureau invert-prone. One of the inverts that resulted is on the 30¢ 1869, and you can see the upside down flags in the proof shown on the left (Scott #121aP4). One of the interesting aspects of U.S. stamp collecting is the search for what are called “design errors”; mistakes in the final design attributed to inadequate research, oversight, artistic license, and pure sloppiness.

They are not valuable as every one of the stamps produced has the same error, but they do show that the public is watching, and they make take what might be an ordinary postage stamp and make it into a conversation piece. We’ll review a few of them, and a few that were questioned, to complete this column.

The 5¢ Norse-American stamp on the right (Scott #621) might be called a non-design error. It caused a bit of a sensation when it was issued in 1925 because the ship, clearly early Norse, not current American, is flying an American flag (arrow). The Post Office Department patiently explained that this was no mistake. The craft is a replica of a Viking “Dragon Ship”, and actually sailed from Norway to the United States between April 30, and June 13, 1893, to participate in the World’s Columbian Exposition. The stamp was designed using actual photographs of the replica.

The 3¢ White Plains issue on the left was released in 1926 (Scott #629) for the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of White Plains, which took place on October 28, 1776. But the Stars and Stripes at the bottom left did not come into being until June 14, 1777.

The 5¢ Flag over White House above raised a few eyebrows when it hit the streets. Note that it does not carry the words “United States” or the short form “U.S.”; one of only a few stamps to take that liberty. Nor does it contain the word “postage.” The latter is curious, but the former was likely deemed appropriate because the Flag design component marked this as an American issue in the same way that Queen Victoria’s presence on Great Britain #1 left no room for doubt as to its origin. The stamp did generate another question as there are only three red stripes next to the blue field of stars, while the correct number is four. Discussion resulted in a finding that the fourth stripe was present, but is hidden by the ripples of the flag.

“Register & Vote” is a laudable message as portrayed on the 1964 5¢ commemorative stamp in Figure 8 (Scott #1249). But it is partially printed across the American Flag. This contravenes the Federal law governing use and presentation of the flag, which provides that nothing must be placed over it or on it when it is illustrated.

Another breach of etiquette is seen on the 25¢ “Bill of Rights” commemorative from 1989 (Scott #2421) seen in Figure 8. It should have been displayed with the stars on the left, and the stripes on the right; not as shown. A result is that we sometimes see the stamp applied upside down on covers as people observe correct flag —if not philatelic — etiquette.

We have a case of an impossible design with regard to the flag on the 32¢ Flag Over Porch stamp in Figure 9 (Scott Design Type A2212). This is complicated, so I will quote from “Flag Faux Pas;” a short article in the July, 1996, Scott Stamp Monthly:

“Those who know the flag well will immediately see something amiss, but identifying the problem is slightly harder. The U.S. flag has 13 stripes, seven of which do not span the entire width of the flag, because of the field.

“The field contains 50 stars in nine rows (five rows of six and four rows of five). Because there are only seven incomplete stripes, all nine rows must feature stars shorter than any stripe. Those on the stamp are larger. It would therefore be an impossibility to fit all 50 stars in this flag’s field.”

There are many other stamps and many other stories that go with them, but we have only so much space here. For the flag connoisseur there are also cancellations with flags in them, cachets with flags part of the design, covers in the form of flags, and a wide variety of Errors, Freaks and Oddities on U.S. Flag stamps.

And if that is not enough to keep you busy, you can branch out into military and State Flags on U.S. stamps, Confederate Flags (dare I say), and even foreign flags on U.S. stamps. The Flag subject is a gift that keeps on giving! (Show at left: The 2017 U.S. Flag stamp.)


Should you wish to comment on this column, or have questions or ideas you would like to have explored in a future column, please write to John Hotchner, VSC Contributor, P.O. Box 1125, Falls Church, VA 22041-0125, or email, putting “VSC” in the subject line.

Or comment right here.

U.S. Scott Catalogue Numbers (December 2016 Update)

s_madonna5143 (47¢) Florentine Madonna and Child
5143a (47¢) Madonna and Child booklet pane of 20

5144 (47¢) Nativity
5144a (47¢) Nativity #5144 CB/20

5145-5148 (47¢) Holiday Window Views
5145 (47¢) Candle in Window
5146 (47¢) Wreath in Window
5147 (47¢) Star in Window
5148 (47¢) Christmas Tree in Window
5148a Block of 4
5148b Holiday Window Views #5145-5148 CB/20

wonderwoman_silver5149-5152 (47¢) Wonder Woman
5149 (47¢) Modern Age Wonder Woman
5150 (47¢) Bronze Age Wonder Woman
5151 (47¢) Silver Age Wonder Woman
5152 (47¢) Golden Age Wonder Woman
5152a vertical strip of 4

5153 (47¢) Hanukkah