Canada 150: Trans-Canada Highway

[press release]
8,000 kilometres of connection: the Trans-Canada Highway celebrated in fifth stamp marking Canada 150
Country music star Dean Brody, on tour, unveils stamp honouring one of Canada’s great achievements of last 50 years

REGINA – Country music star Dean Brody, while on tour, unveiled a stamp today that captures the Trans-Canada Highway, the 8,000-kilometre ribbon of adventures, dreams and memories – and a key economic artery for Canadian business.

Brody, winner of multiple Juno Awards and more than a dozen Canadian Country Music Awards, took a few hours away from his cross-country arena tour – which is largely following the Trans-Canada – to unveil the stamp at the home of Brandt Group of Companies, located alongside the iconic highway. Headquartered in Regina with operations across the country, Brandt is an international success story that depends heavily on the Trans-Canada for its business.

The Trans-Canada Highway stamp is the fifth of 10 stamps being issued by Canada Post to celebrate Canada 150. The stamps mark unforgettable moments in Canada since our country’s centennial in 1967.

Brody has travelled thousands of kilometres on the Trans-Canada Highway, chasing his dream and touring – as he is now, from Ontario to British Columbia. The highway, and the people and places he’s encountered along it, have inspired some of his music and songwriting.

Trans-Canada connects our country
The Trans-Canada runs through all 10 provinces – from St. John’s, N.L. to Victoria, B.C. It is one of the longest national road systems on the planet, and links to roads that lead to Yukon and the Northwest Territories. Construction started in 1950 and the highway officially opened in 1962 – but it was not completed until 1971. Today, the Trans-Canada has multiple routes that connect almost every major city in Canada, and links to roads heading into the United States.

Distinguished by its white-on-green maple-leaf markers, the highway holds a special place in the hearts of those who’ve travelled it – by car, bicycle or on foot, or at the wheel of a transport truck – and even more so for those who’ve ventured along its entire length. It has fed our desire for adventure and fuelled our fascination with the open road, inviting family or buddy road trips for generations of Canadians.

A highway of dreams and possibilities
Its endless lonely stretches are legendary; its stunning vistas are unforgettable. To know this highway well is to have hard-earned respect for Canada’s weather and Canada’s immensity – and to appreciate the friendliness of its people. From singers and bands to job-seekers, junior hockey teams and students heading off to college or university, countless Canadians have taken this highway to their dreams.

A vital economic link for Canadians
Communities and Canadians also rely on the Trans-Canada for their livelihoods every day. A perfect example is the Brandt Group of Companies, which hosted Canada Post’s Trans-Canada stamp launch at one of its facilities alongside the highway. Brandt employs nearly 2,000 people across Canada and the U.S., servicing markets in over 20 countries and six continents. It relies heavily on the Trans-Canada for its agricultural, construction and railway equipment business.

Five more Canada 150 stamps to come
Each stamp in the set has been unveiled by a distinguished Canadian individual or group related to the moment being celebrated. The location of each stamp launch also directly relates to the moment being commemorated. The stamp celebrating Expo 67 was unveiled in Montréal by Habitat 67 architect Moshe Safdie on April 27, while the stamp honouring the Constitution and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was unveiled on Parliament Hill on May 3. The third stamp, which pays tribute to the Canadarm and Canadian innovation, was unveiled by Canadian Space Agency astronaut Jeremy Hansen at a recorded event at a Toronto school and released online May 4.

The fourth stamp, commemorating the 2005 passage of the Civil Marriage Act – which made marriage equality the law in Canada – was unveiled in Toronto on May 9 in partnership with The 519, an organization that supports the LGBTQ community. The next stamp in the Canada 150 set will be unveiled in St. John’s on May 25.

The remaining stamps will be revealed individually at cities across the country, the last of them on June 1.

About the stamp
Each of the 10 maple-leaf shaped die-cut PermanentTM domestic-rate stamps measures 40 mm x 40 mm and is printed in 6 colours plus tagging. The self-adhesive stamps are available in a booklet of 10 (4 million stamps). A gummed pane of 10 stamps, with circle perforations 4.5 cm in diameter, is also available (80,000 panes). Official First Day Covers, one for each stamp design and each cancelled in OTTAWA ON, are available in a pack of 10 (10,000 packs). The stamp issue was designed by Roy White and Liz Wurzinger of Subplot Design Inc. in Vancouver, B.C., and printed by the Lowe-Martin Group.

Formula 1 Grand Prix du Canada (Canada 2017)

[press release]
Canada Post’s Formula One stamps honour five legends who together have won 17 FORMULA 1 GRAND PRIX DU CANADA races
Sir Jackie Stewart and Joann Villeneuve help to unveil stamps MONTRÉAL, May 15, 2017 – Less than a month before the next race in Montréal, the legendary Sir Jackie Stewart and the first lady of Canadian racing, Joann Villeneuve, helped to unveil stamps featuring five famous drivers who won the FORMULA 1 GRAND PRIX DU CANADA. The F1™ in Canada stamps celebrate 50 years of the race in this country by honouring five winning drivers, one for each decade of F1 in Canada: Sir Jackie Stewart (Scotland), Gilles Villeneuve (Canada), Ayrton Senna (Brazil), Michael Schumacher (Germany) and Lewis Hamilton (England).

Five famous Canadian Grand Prix winners
The five are national heroes in their homelands and legends internationally. As a group, they have won 220 Grand Prix races – 17 of them in Canada – taken 216 poles, 399 podiums, and 16 World Championships.

Between 1994 and 2004, Schumacher won an unrivalled seven FORMULA 1 GRAND PRIX DU CANADA races. Hamilton, who is still racing, has won five. He hopes to make it six at the 38th Grand Prix on Île Notre-Dame on June 11. Stewart and Senna both won two Canadian races – Stewart at Mosport in 1971 and 1972 and Senna in Montréal in 1988 and 1990. Gilles Villeneuve recorded his first Grand Prix victory at the island track that now bears his name and remains the only Canadian to win an F1 race in Canada.

F1 enthusiasts welcome Villeneuve, Stewart
About 150 guests at 1700 La Poste, an art space built in a former post office, watched Ms. Villeneuve unveil a stamp of her late husband before Stewart unveiled his own stamp.

The stamps feature head-and-shoulder images of the drivers. The cover of a booklet of 10 depicts an F1 car rocketing past a grandstand, with the Montréal Biosphère looming in the background. The set and related products are available at canadapost.ca/shop.

FORMULA 1 GRAND PRIX DU CANADA
The first FORMULA 1 GRAND PRIX DU CANADA was at the Mosport track near Toronto in 1967, which hosted many great drivers until 1977, including Stewart, Emerson Fittipaldi, James Hunt and Jody Scheckter. It was also run at Circuit Mont-Tremblant in Quebec. The race later moved to a course on Île Notre-Dame in Montréal. After his death in 1982, the track was named Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve in his honour.

Background:
Sir Jackie Stewart
– Stewart was the man to beat in the first decade of the Canadian Grand Prix. He raced F1 from 1965 to 1973. In nine years of racing, he won 27 races, took 43 podiums, 17 poles and three World Championships. He raced in Canada’s first Formula 1 race at Mosport in 1967, where he also had the last F1 race of his career in 1973. His one-man safety crusade revolutionized safety in the sport, while his communication skills made it more popular. He set new standards of professionalism for drivers and helped Formula One® realize its commercial potential. In 2001 he was knighted for his services to motor sport.

Gilles Villeneuve – This flamboyantly aggressive driver with amazing control represents the second decade of the FORMULA 1 GRAND PRIX DU CANADA. He raced F1® for McLaren and Ferrari from 1977 to 1982, winning six races, taking 13 podiums and two poles in a career that lasted little more than four seasons. He won the FORMULA 1 GRAND PRIX DU CANADA at the inaugural race on Île Notre-Dame, about an hour from where he grew up in Berthierville. About 70,000 fans were bundled in blankets and tuques on that frigid October day in 1978, when Villeneuve became a national hero. On May 8, 1982, aged 32, Villeneuve was killed in a crash while qualifying for the FORMULA 1 BELGIAN GRAND PRIX. He was among the first inducted to the Canadian Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1993.

Ayrton Senna – A fierce and fearless driver with spectacular raw talent and terrifying determination represents the third decade of Grand Prix racing in Canada. He dominated F1 from the mid-1980s until his fatal accident in Italy in 1994, aged 34. He raced F1 from 1984 to 1994. In 161 starts, he logged 41 wins, 80 podiums, 65 poles and three World Championships. For many fans in Brazil, his homeland and all over the world, he was the purest driver to compete in F1.

Michael Schumacher – Representing the fourth decade is the most successful driver in the sport’s history. Schumacher raced F1 from 1991 to 2006 and 2010 to 2012. In 308 races, he registered 91 wins, took 155 podiums, 68 poles and a record seven World Championships. He won his first World Championship in 1994 and his second in 1995. After breaking his leg in 1999, he mounted a comeback that saw him win five consecutive World Championships from 2000 to 2004. He retired at the end of 2006 but returned to race from 2010 to 2012.

Lewis Hamilton – In Italy, they call him “Il Phenomeno” – the Phenomenon. In terms of raw ability, few drivers compare to the man who represents the fifth decade. Hamilton won four races in his rookie season in 2007 and finished on the podium in the first nine races of his brilliant, ongoing career. In his 193 starts, the three-time World Champion has recorded 55 wins, 108 podiums and 64 poles. Hamilton has finished in the top five in points in each of his 10 years in F1. He won the World Championship in 2008 and back-to-back titles in 2014 and 2015.

About the stamps
Designed by Paprika and printed by Colour Innovations, the stamps measure 24 mm by 30 mm and are available in booklets of 10, a pane of five stamps (160 mm x 200 mm) and as an uncut press sheet (358 mm x 608 mm). Official First Day Covers are cancelled in Montréal and are available as a set of five with a commemorative folder. A limited edition framed pane of stamps is also available along with limited edition framed enlargements of each stamp. Jackie Stewart signed 500 Official First Day Covers, which are only included with his framed enlargement.
About Formula 1®
Formula 1® racing, which began in 1950, is the world’s most prestigious motor racing competition and is the world’s most popular annual sporting series. In 2016 it was watched by 400 million unique television viewers from over 200 territories. The 2017 FIA Formula One World Championship™ runs from March to November and spans 20 races in 20 countries across five continents. Formula One World Championship Limited is part of Formula 1, and holds the exclusive commercial rights to the FIA Formula One World Championship™.

Media advisory
Canada Post brings you up to speed in celebrating the first 50 years of the Formula 1 Grand Prix du Canada

MONTRÉAL, May 11, 2017 /CNW/ – Legendary drivers harnessing awesome power at incredible speed with skill, daring and courage: that’s how Formula 1 auto races thrill fans in Montréal, in Canada and around the world.

On Monday, May 15, Canada Post and Octane Racing Group Inc. will bring together five decades from the world of F1 racing to unveil a set of stamps commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Formula 1 Grand Prix du Canada.

WHAT:

Unveiling of a set of stamps commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Formula 1 Grand Prix du Canada

WHEN:

Monday, May 15, 4:30 p.m.

WHERE:

1700 La Poste
1700, rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréalbr>
(corner of rue Notre-Dame and rue Richmond)

Canada 150: Marriage Equality

[press release]
Canada Post and The 519 unveil stamp commemorating the road to marriage equality
Stamp is the fourth in a set of 10 that will showcase historic moments from the last 50 years in celebration of Canada 150

TORONTO, May 9, 2017 – At an event today in downtown Toronto, Canada Post unveiled a stamp commemorating the 2005 passage of the Civil Marriage Act, which made marriage equality the law throughout Canada. Grassroots activists, government officials and community members attended the unveiling, catching the first glimpse of the new stamp, which features the iconic rainbow symbol. The unveiling was held at and in partnership with The 519, a City of Toronto agency committed to the health, happiness and full participation of LGBTQ communities.

The marriage equality stamp is the fourth in a set of 10 that Canada Post is issuing to celebrate Canada’s 150th year since Confederation. Collectively the stamps highlight historic moments that have taken place in our nation over the past 50 years. Canada Post’s stamp advisory committee, which includes historians, collectors and artists, selected these 10 milestones that together have helped shape the story of Canada.

The road to the legislation
Twelve years ago, on February 1, 2005, the Civil Marriage Act was introduced in Parliament as Bill C-38. After it was passed in the House of Commons and then in the Senate, the bill received Royal Assent on July 20, 2005, and marriage equality officially became the law. But the road to achieving marriage equality in Canada began long before 2005. For decades, LGBTQ activists and supporters from coast to coast to coast had fought for the rights of their communities, including the right to marry. In the late 1990s, the community began to achieve significant victories.

For instance, in 1996, the federal government passed Bill C-33 adding sexual orientation to the Canadian Human Rights Act; three years later, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that same-sex couples should have the same benefits and obligations as opposite-sex common-law couples from social programs that they contribute to. A year later, Parliament passed Bill C-23 that made the Court ruling law.

Marriage equality debate takes centre stage
In early 2001, the battle for the right to marry took centre stage, after Reverend Brent Hawkes married two same-sex couples in a ceremony in Toronto. When the City refused to issue marriage licenses for these unions, it set off a series of heated court battles and public debate. The legal challenges culminated on June 10, 2003, when the Ontario Court of Appeal upheld a lower court ruling that prohibiting same-sex couples from marrying was a violation of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Within hours of the decision, Michael Leshner and Michael Stark were married in Toronto, the first same-sex couple to wed after the legislation. Similar court battles were also taking place in provinces across the country, and more provincial courts issued rulings legalizing marriage equality: B.C. in July 2003, followed by Quebec, Manitoba, and Nova Scotia in 2004. Finally, on July 20, 2005, the government of Canada passed the federal legislation that legalized marriage equality across the country, making Canada the fourth country in the world and the first outside of Europe to grant same-sex couples the right to marry the one they loved.

Today, with support continuing to grow across the globe, more than 20 countries have legalized same‑sex marriage on the national level. To hear more from LGBTQ community members and activists about this fight for equality, please visit canadapost.ca/canada150. To learn more about the work of The 519, please visit www.The519.org.

The next stamp in the Canada 150 set will be unveiled in Regina on May 16. The remaining stamps will be revealed individually at cities across the country, the last of them on June 1.

About the stamps
Each of the 10 maple-leaf shaped die-cut PermanentTM domestic-rate stamps measures 40 mm x 40 mm and is printed in 6 colours plus tagging. The self-adhesive stamps are available in a booklet of 10 (4 million stamps). A gummed pane of 10 stamps, with circle perforations 4.5 cm in diameter, is also available (80,000 panes). Official First Day Covers, one for each stamp design and each cancelled in OTTAWA ON, are available in a pack of 10 (10,000 packs). The stamp issue was designed by Roy White and Liz Wurzinger of Subplot Design Inc. in Vancouver, B.C., and printed by the Lowe-Martin Group.

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[press release]
Celebrating the Right to Equal Marriage and Continuing the Work for LGBTQ2S Human Rights
The 519 celebrates The Civil Marriage Act 2005 with the launch of Canada Post’s new commemorative stamp.

TORONTO, May 9, 2017 /CNW/ – The 519 is excited to be partnering with Canada Post for an event that will highlight the struggles for marriage equality in Canada, and celebrate this important moment in the country’s history. In this event, as part of the Canada 150 celebrations, Canada Post is releasing a new stamp to commemorate the hard-fought right of equal marriage in Canada.

During the struggle for equal marriage in Canada, The 519 served our communities by providing free, accommodating non-judgemental space where individuals, organizations, activists, and non-profit groups were able to meet, organize and work towards the goal of equal marriage. Many of our members and staff were an active part of the movement and we are proud to have been part of that journey and legacy.

Today, more than ever, The 519 continues to provide space for change through a number of important programs and services to meet the emerging needs of the LGBTQ2S communities. Today that space also reflects our leadership in building the capacity of public and private organizations and institutions to create inclusive spaces of their own. We also continue to work towards finding systemic solutions that address the social and economic barriers faced by the LGBTQ2S communities.

The fight for equal marriage that culminated in the Civil Marriage Act in 2005 represents the struggle and hard work of those who were at the forefront, but that time in history also stands for the power of working together and creating meaningful dialogue between the people, civil society, government and the courts. The 519 continues to believe in that power of conversation and is working even harder today to create a world where matters of equality and freedom are discussed and resolved with openness and love.
To know about our programs and services, our activities during Pride Toronto, or to learn more about our capacity building initiatives for organizations, media or general public, please contact us.

About The 519:
The 519 is a City of Toronto agency and a registered charity committed to the health, happiness and full participation of the LGBTQ communities in Toronto and beyond. We have an innovative model of Service, Space and Leadership and through our programs, services, and capacity building initiatives – we strive to make a real difference in people’s lives while working to promote inclusion, understanding and respect.

Canada 150th: Canadarm (Canada 2017)

[press release]
Canadian astronaut Jeremy Hansen unveils Canadarm stamp at Toronto school
Stamp is third in a set of 10 that captures unforgettable moments of the last 50 years as country celebrates Canada 150

TORONTO, May 4, 2017 – Canadian Space Agency astronaut Jeremy Hansen was at a Toronto school to unveil a stamp with an image of Canada’s most famous robotics accomplishment – the Canadarm. The stamp commemorates Canada’s achievements in space, science, technology and innovation.

Hansen was on-site at Glen Ames Senior Public School on April 28 to unveil the stamp and meet with Grade 7 and 8 students from the school’s robotics club as they prepare to travel to California to compete in an international robotics competition. Students competing were tasked to design, build and program a robot made entirely of Lego to solve a real-world problem. The team came up with the PetPortion – a robot that manages a pet’s weight by automatically giving it the proper amount of food based on its weight and level of daily exercise.

Hansen also addressed the entire school and encouraged the next generation of Canadian innovators to pursue education in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Hansen features in video, unveils third stamp for Canada 150
The Canadarm stamp is the third in a set of 10 to be issued which mark Canada 150. Each stamp celebrates a significant and unforgettable moment in the life of this country since its centennial in 1967.

The 10 moments and achievements, which have become pillars of Canada’s collective memory, were selected by Canada Post’s stamp advisory committee, which includes historians, archivists, graphic designers and philatelists. A video featuring Hansen and a magazine article about the Canadarm are on canadapost.ca/canada150.

Canadarm showcased Canada’s expertise in space and robotics
The Canadarm’s first mission was aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on November 13, 1981. It manoeuvred astronauts, satellites and cargo over 30 years before it retired when the Space Shuttle program ended in 2011. The Canadarm launched Canada’s close partnership with NASA on human space flight. Eight Canadian astronauts have flown in space, participating in 16 missions aboard either a space shuttle or on the International Space Station: Roberta Bondar, Marc Garneau, Chris Hadfield, Steve MacLean, Julie Payette, Robert Thirsk, Bjarni Tryggvason and Dave Williams.

Currently Canada has two active astronauts: David Saint-Jacques and Jeremy Hansen, and two additional astronauts are expected to be announced this summer.

The Canadarm was instrumental in establishing Canada’s reputation for robotics innovation and led to a new generation of Canadian robotics on the International Space Station (ISS). It will inspire future generations of Canadian scientists and engineers as they develop new technologies that make the world a better, easier and safer place.

Each stamp in the set has been unveiled by a distinguished Canadian individual or group related to the moment being celebrated. The setting for each stamp launch also directly relates to the moment being commemorated. The stamp that celebrates Expo 67 was unveiled in Montréal by Habitat 67 architect Moshe Safdie on April 27 and the stamp about the Constitution and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was unveiled on Parliament Hill on May 3. The next stamp in the Canada 150 set will be revealed in Toronto on Tuesday, May 9. The others will be unveiled individually at cities across the country, the last of them on June 1.

About the stamp
Each of the 10 maple-leaf shaped die-cut Permanent domestic-rate stamps measures 40 mm X 40 mm and is printed in 6 colours plus tagging. The self-adhesive stamps are available in a booklet of 10 (4 million stamps). A gummed pane of 10 stamps, with circle perforations 4.5 cm in diameter, is also available (80,000 panes). Official First Day Covers, one for each stamp design and each cancelled in OTTAWA ON, are available in a pack of 10 (10,000 packs). The stamp issue was designed by Roy White and Liz Wurzinger of Subplot Design Inc. in Vancouver, B.C., and printed by the Lowe-Martin Group.

Canada 150: Charter of Rights & Freedoms (Canada 2017)

[press release]
Charter of Rights and Freedoms, patriation of Constitution are commemorated in new stamp issued by Canada Post
Stamp is second in a set of 10 that marks unforgettable moments of the last 50 years, as part of Canada 150 celebrations

OTTAWA, May 3, 2017 – Only a peaceful nation achieves full independence with the stroke of a pen, thousands of citizens erupting in cheers and a band striking up a fanfare – which is how Canada brought its Constitution home.

That achievement is commemorated in a new stamp that Canada Post unveiled today on Parliament Hill, together with the Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, P.C., Chief Justice of Canada.

Full constitutional independence in a historic ceremony
On a wet and windy April 17, 1982, on the steps of Parliament Hill, before a sea of onlookers under umbrellas and waving Canadian flags, Queen Elizabeth II signed the Proclamation of the Constitution Act, 1982. Our Constitution was finally ours alone: Canada now had full autonomy to amend it without involving the British Parliament. As well, we would live under a Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms that guarantees the fundamental protections and liberties we all enjoy.

Today, 35 years later, Canadians still rank the Charter as our most important national symbol, says Statistics Canada. For all these reasons, Canada Post – the nation’s storyteller because of its iconic national stamp program – is proudly commemorating the Constitution and Charter with a special stamp. [Photo, left to right: Steven MacKinnon, Member of Parliament for Gatineau, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services & Procurement; Deepak Chopra, President and Chief Executive Officer, Canada Post; The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, P.C., Chief Justice of Canada. Photo by Canada Post/Denis Drever.]

A range of rights worth cherishing
Under the Charter, Canadians have the right to freedom of speech, religion, thought and expression, as well as freedom of the press, of mobility, of association and of assembly, among others. The Charter also enshrines citizens’ rights to vote, to run for office, to a fair trial, to security and privacy, as well as important linguistic rights. The Charter also confers equality upon every individual in Canada – regardless of race, religion, national or ethnic origin, colour, sex, age or physical or mental disability. Governments must not discriminate on these grounds in laws or programs.

A video featuring former prime minister Jean Chrétien, who led the negotiations toward the patriation of the Constitution and the creation of the Charter; former Supreme Court justice Michel Bastarache; and Linda Cardinal, full professor and Research Chair on Francophonie and Public Policy, University of Ottawa; is on canadapost.ca/canada150.

This stamp is the second to be issued in a set of 10 that marks Canada 150 by celebrating unforgettable moments in the last 50 years of the country. They are the first stamps in Canada Post’s history to be issued in the shape of our iconic national symbol, the maple leaf. The first stamp, celebrating Expo 67, was unveiled in Montréal on April 27 by world-renowned architect Moshe Safdie, who designed the famous Habitat 67 complex depicted on the stamp.

About the stamp
Each of the 10 maple-leaf shaped die-cut Permanent domestic-rate stamps measures 40 mm X 40 mm and is printed in 6 colours plus tagging. The self-adhesive stamps are available in a booklet of 10 (4 million stamps). A gummed pane of 10 stamps, with circle perforations 4.5 cm in diameter, is also available (80,000 panes). Official First Day Covers, one for each stamp design and each cancelled in OTTAWA ON, are available in a pack of 10 (10,000 packs). The stamp issue was designed by Roy White and Liz Wurzinger of Subplot Design Inc. in Vancouver, B.C., and printed by the Lowe-Martin Group.

The third of 10 Canada 150 stamps to be unveiled online
By lauding Canadian innovation and technology, Canada Post continues to tell compelling celebratory stories for Canada 150

TORONTO – Canada Post will continue to celebrate Canada 150 by unveiling the third of 10 special commemorative stamps, this one with special guest Canadian astronaut Jeremy Hansen (details below).

Each of the 10 stamps to be unveiled separately over the next five weeks tells an exceptional story about a Canadian achievement, milestone or unforgettable moment from the past 50 years (since Canada’s centennial in 1967). These multimedia events will be Canada Post at its best as the country’s storyteller, a role anchored in its iconic national stamp program.

These moments of great significance were chosen by Canada Post’s independent Stamp Advisory Committee – 12 members of the public who are experts in their field, including historians, archivists, philatelists, graphic designers and others.

The Event:

An online stamp reveal commemorating one of Canada’s proudest and most celebratory moments with special guest Canadian astronaut Jeremy Hansen and the students of Glen Ames Senior Public School in Toronto.

WHAT: Unveiling the third of 10 stamps that will highlight unforgettable moments of Canada’s past 50 years, in honour of Canada 150.

WHEN: Thursday, May 4, 10 a.m.

WHERE: Online only. A video unveiling the third stamp will be posted on the Canada Post Magazine at CanadaPost.ca/Canada150

Star Trek 2017 (Canada 2017)

[press release]
Admiral James T. Kirk and Starfleet’s finest captains materialize on dramatic Canadian Star Trek™ stamps
Bold explorers are shadowed by the menacing villains they faced

OTTAWA, April 28, 2017 /CNW/ – Canada Post today issued a set of seven Star Trek stamps that celebrate each of Starfleet’s finest leaders, dramatically depicting them with the most cunning of the adversaries they confronted on their voyages.

Five stamps are dedicated to the exploits of James T. Kirk (Montréal-born actor William Shatner), Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart), Benjamin Sisko (Avery Brooks), Kathryn Janeway (Kate Mulgrew) and Jonathan Archer (Scott Bakula).

Two additional stamps feature the intrepid shuttlecraft Galileo, which was often deployed for missions too dangerous for the U.S.S. Enterprise, and the ominous Borg cube, which has been specially enhanced with holographic foil and embossing.

A sequel to last year’s 50th anniversary collection, these seven stamps feature:

  • Admiral James T. Kirk with Khan Noonien Singh (Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan™, 1982)
  • Captain Jean-Luc Picard with Locutus of Borg (Star Trek: The Next Generation™, 1987-1994)
  • Captain Benjamin Sisko with Dukat (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine™, 1993-1999)
  • Captain Kathryn Janeway with the Borg Queen (Star Trek: Voyager™, 1995-2001)
  • Captain Jonathan Archer with Commander Dolim (Star Trek: Enterprise™, 2001-2005)
  • The classic shuttlecraft Galileo (first appearance in Star Trek, 1966)
  • The Borg cube (first appearance in Star Trek: The Next Generation, 1989)

About the stamps
Designed by Signals Design Group and printed by the Lowe-Martin Group, the five stamps featuring Starfleet heroes measure 24 mm by 30 mm and are available in booklets of 10, as a pane of five stamps, and as an uncut press sheet. The shuttlecraft stamp, measuring 24 mm by 20 mm, is available as a coil of 50 stamps. All seven stamps, including the uniquely-shaped Borg cube, which measures 67 mm by 62 mm and is enhanced with holographic foil and embossing, are available ready-to-mail in a prestige booklet. The Official First Day Covers – all cancelled in Vulcan, Alberta, except Kirk’s, which is cancelled in Montréal, Quebec – are available only as a set of seven.

From Canada Post’s Details magazine (philatelic catalogue):

Captain’s log
Stardate: April 27, 2017. A second year on the edge of the final frontier concludes our exploration of the best of Star TrekTM. We’ve discovered seven new stamps and added them to our collection. Led by James T. Kirk (played by Montréal-born William Shatner), they feature three Starfleet captains who followed in his footsteps and one who made humanity’s first foray into interstellar space. Although we have made some great discoveries, our mission has also been dangerous. Starfleet’s finest share their stamps with some of the galaxy’s most nefarious villains. We also learned of a tiny but intrepid shuttlecraft coil stamp and a large, looming Borg design …

TRANSMISSION INTERRUPTED …
INCOMING TRANSMISSION …

We are the Borg. Lower your shields and prepare to be assimilated. Your technological and philatelic distinctiveness will be added to our own. Your stamps will bring us closer to perfection. Resistance is futile.

After Star Trek finished its three-year run in 1969, fans were left yearning for more stories from the stars. William Shatner’s James T. Kirk had captured imaginations and, with fan interest mounting, Star Trek: The Motion Picture debuted in 1979, kicking off six original series feature films – including fan favourite Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. But Kirk did more than inspire fans, he set the standard for every Starfleet captain to come. Five stamps in this issue pay homage to Kirk and his counterparts Jean-Luc Picard, Benjamin Sisko, Kathryn Janeway and Jonathan Archer. These Starfleet heroes saved the galaxy time after time, even in the face of the seemingly unstoppable villains whose likenesses loom in the background. Two other stamps celebrate the intrepid Class-F shuttle and ominous Borg cube.

Designed by Kosta Tsetsekas and Adrian Horvath, of Signals Design Group, these stamps share a similar look to those issued in 2016, with a more modern feel.

“There’s more drama,” says Horvath, adding that, as a fan of Star Trek: The Next Generation, revisiting the futuristic series stoked a renewed interest in his favourite episodes.

Admiral Kirk vs. Khan Noonien Singh
After completing his original five-year mission and earning a promotion, Admiral James T. Kirk set an unassailable standard for every Starfleet captain. But being stuck behind a desk at Starfleet Command made the aging admiral restless. Kirk rejoined the U.S.S. Enterprise, the first step toward a final show- down with his most cunning and deadly adversary: Khan. Set on revenge, the genetically enhanced superhuman cost Kirk the life of his closest companion.

Captain Picard vs. Locutus of Borg
More “by the book” than Kirk, Captain Jean-Luc Picard led his crew with stern professionalism. When Borg drones invaded the U.S.S. Enterprise-D, they captured and assimilated Picard into the Borg Collective. Renamed Locutus and forced to be the Borg’s spokesperson, Picard was eventually rescued by his crew, though not before he was the Borg’s unwilling agent of destruction. Haunted, Picard finally overcame his demons in a final showdown with the Borg Queen.

Captain Sisko vs. Dukat
Posted to the space station Deep Space 9, near the planet Bajor, Captain Benjamin Sisko took to heart his mission to help the Bajorans recover from the Cardassian occupation. Dukat, the dangerous former prefect of the station, considered Sisko’s new role as a personal affront – and wanted revenge. This animosity led to escalating tensions between the Federation and a new, powerful enemy known as the Dominion, and placed Captain Sisko at the centre of a battle between good and evil.

Captain Janeway vs. the Borg Queen
Sent to pursue renegades known as the Maquis, Captain Kathryn Janeway and the crew of the U.S.S. Voyager thought they’d be home in no time. Unexpectedly, Voyager and a Maquis vessel were transported to the other side of the galaxy. Far from home, the two crews united and began a decades- long journey back to the Federation. In the end, Janeway faced off against the enigmatic Borg Queen and used the Collective’s advanced technology to speed Voyager’s return home.

Captain Archer vs. Commander Dolim
One of Starfleet’s earliest pioneers, Captain Jonathan Archer represented United Earth before the founding of the Federation. In 2153, Archer and the Enterprise NX-01 responded when the mysterious Xindi suddenly attacked Earth. The Enterprise trailed the Xindi to a dangerous region of space known as the Delphic Expanse, where Archer confronted Commander Dolim, a genocidal Xindi-Reptilian convinced that the destruction of humanity would ensure the survival of his people.

The shuttlecraft – Galileo
The U.S.S. Enterprise carried a fleet of shuttlecraft designed for short-range space exploration, planetary landings, and (often) dangerous missions. The first of these shuttles – named Galileo (NCC-1701⁄7) – met an explosive fate in orbit around Taurus II, seconds after its crew was beamed safely to the Enterprise. In honour of the spunky little craft, its name was passed on to future models, making it the most famous of the Enterprise sidekicks.

The Borg
The cybernetic Borg had no interest in diplomacy; they sought only to achieve perfection by assimilating different species. Those assimilated lost all sense of individual identity and became merely an extension of the Borg Collective – a fate many considered worse than death. The appearance of a Borg cube – the Collective’s formidable spaceship – often meant the destruction of a civilization. Resistance, as the Borg said, was futile.

Canada 150: Habitat 67 (Canada 2017)

[press release]
World-renowned architect Moshe Safdie and Canada Post unveil stamp depicting Habitat 67 complex to celebrate Expo 67
Stamp is first in a set of 10 that will capture unforgettable moments of the last 50 years as country celebrates Canada 150

MONTRÉAL, April 27, 2017 /CNW/ – Canada Post and Moshe Safdie, whose revolutionary Habitat 67 modular housing complex earned global accolades as an icon of urban living, today unveiled a stamp with an image of his futuristic structure representing the event for which it was built: Expo 67.

The Expo 67 stamp is the first of 10 to be issued to mark Canada’s 150th year since Confederation. Each one celebrates a significant and unforgettable moment in the life of this country since its centennial in 1967. The 10 moments and achievements, which have become pillars of Canada’s collective memory, were selected by Canada Post’s stamp advisory committee, which includes historians, collectors and artists. A video featuring Safdie and a magazine article about Expo 67 are available at canadapost.ca/Canada150.

Safdie unveiled the stamp in the very building that forever placed his signature on his adopted city. With Habitat 67, Safdie – a bold, brash and brilliant young architect on the verge of launching a significant global career – captured an era of optimism, energy and progress. This project also launched his incredible career that has had him design prestigious buildings around the world, including the National Gallery of Canada, the Quebec Museum of Civilization, Marina Bay Sands in Singapore and the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C.

Habitat 67 was perfect for Expo 67, the international festival that transformed its host city of Montréal and the country itself. Canada introduced itself to the world with Expo 67 as a country of seemingly boundless talent and potential. The event brought Canadians from across the country and visitors from around the world together for six months between April and October 1967. When Canada’s population was only 20 million, more than 50 million people attended. That ratio set a per-capita attendance record for a World’s Fair, which still stands. It is widely considered the most successful World’s Fair of the 20th century.

Those six months became a landmark moment for Canada – socially, culturally and politically. Several generations of Canadians have since pointed to it as the signature event of our centennial year. It featured pavilions from 62 countries, as well as Canada’s provinces and territories. It was an opportunity for Canadians to get better acquainted with Quebec culture. It attracted many notable figures of the time, including Queen Elizabeth II, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson, Princess Grace of Monaco, Jacqueline Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy, and Bing Crosby. The Ed Sullivan Show was broadcast live from Expo 67 twice that May. Many Canadians associate Bobby Gimby’s popular centennial tune Ca-na-da with Expo 67.

With the theme “Man and His World,” the event also showcased Canadian innovation – be it technology, urban planning, industry or architecture. The vision and legacy of Expo 67 still echo today through Montréal’s infrastructure, architecture, public art and the two islands in the St. Lawrence River.

The next stamp in the Canada 150 set will be revealed in Ottawa on Wednesday, May 3. The others will be unveiled individually at cities across the country, the last of them on June 1.

About the stamp
Each of the 10 maple-leaf shaped die-cut PermanentTM domestic-rate stamps measures 40 mm x 40 mm and is printed in 6 colours plus tagging. The self-adhesive stamps are available in a booklet of 10 (4 million stamps). A gummed pane of 10 stamps, with circle perforations 4.5 cm in diameter, is also available (80,000 panes). Official First Day Covers, one for each stamp design and each cancelled in OTTAWA ON, are available in a pack of 10 (10,000 packs). The stamp issue was designed by Roy White and Liz Wurzinger of Subplot Design Inc. in Vancouver, B.C., and printed by the Lowe-Martin Group.

About Moshe Safdie
Moshe Safdie is an architect, urban planner, educator, theorist, and author. Beginning with his architectural thesis at McGill University in 1964 and the pioneering housing complex Habitat 67 in Montréal, Safdie’s design philosophy has been consistently responsive to local historic, cultural, and environmental contexts. With his global firm, Safdie Architects, notable projects include the National Gallery of Canada; Marina Bay Sands in Singapore; Khalsa Heritage Centre in Punjab, India; and the United States Institute of Peace headquarters in Washington, D.C. Safdie has been recognized widely for his enduring influence on the built environment. He is the recipient of the Companion of the Order of Canada, the Gold Medal from both the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the American Institute of Architects, la Médaille du Mérite from the Order of Architects of Québec, and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Awards 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award. He continues to inspire the theory and application of ideas about housing, mixed use, and high density in cities around the world.

Celebrities to Unveil Canadian Stamps

[press release]
In honour of Canada 150, notable Canadians will help unveil stamps celebrating 10 unforgettable moments since 1967
Maple leaf-shaped stamps will be a first for Canada Post

OTTAWA – Canada Post has enlisted the help of several distinguished Canadians to unveil 10 special commemorative stamps that celebrate the most significant moments in the life of the country since it proudly marked its Centennial.

In a video message (view here), Canada Post President and CEO Deepak Chopra, joined by Canada Post employees and Steven MacKinnon, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, proudly introduces this special stamp program in celebration of Canada 150, the country’s sesquicentennial.

The impressive Canadians include a country music star, a world-renowned architect, successful business leaders, influential community activists, legendary athletes and an astronaut. Over the next five weeks, separate unveilings will occur, each one at a location chosen to illustrate the story behind the achievement, event or milestone that the stamp commemorates.

This will also be the first time in Canada Post’s history that stamps will be issued in the shape of a maple leaf.

With each stamp unveiling, videos with these notable Canadians, other key participants and archival footage will tell the story of that stamp subject on canadapost.ca/canada150.

The first of the 10 stamps will be unveiled on April 27 in Montréal. The remainder will be revealed separately over five weeks, culminating with the unveiling of two stamps on June 1. On that day, all 10 Permanent™ domestic-rate stamps will be available in various formats – at post offices and online, via mail order or phone. Customers can also pre-order at canadapost.ca/canada150 or by phone.

As with all Canada Post stamps, the subjects were chosen by the Canada Post Stamp Advisory Committee. These 12 members of the public are experts in their particular field. They include historians, archivists, graphic designers, philatelists and others.

[COMMUNIQUÉ]

Pour les 150 ans du Canada, des personnalités canadiennes dévoileront 10 timbres célébrant des moments marquants depuis 1967
Postes Canada émettra pour la toute première fois des timbres en forme de feuille d’érable

OTTAWA – Postes Canada a invité plusieurs Canadiens de renom à participer au dévoilement de 10 timbres commémoratifs soulignant les moments les plus marquants de l’histoire du pays depuis son centenaire.

Dans un message vidéo (visionner ici), le président-directeur général de Postes Canada Deepak Chopra, accompagné d’employés de la Société et de Steven MacKinnon, secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre des Services publics et de l’Approvisionnement, a fièrement présenté le programme de timbres-poste Canada 150 célébrant le cent cinquantenaire du pays.

L’impressionnante liste de personnalités canadiennes invitées compte notamment une vedette de musique country, un architecte de renommée mondiale, des chefs d’entreprise prospères, des activistes communautaires influents, des athlètes légendaires et un astronaute. Au cours des cinq prochaines semaines, les dévoilements individuels auront lieu à des endroits symboliques choisis selon la réalisation ou le moment qu’illustre le timbre présenté.

De plus, pour la toute première fois dans l’histoire de Postes Canada, les timbres émis auront la forme d’une feuille d’érable.

Pour chaque timbre dévoilé, des vidéos mettant en vedette des Canadiens célèbres, d’autres acteurs importants et des images d’archives raconteront l’histoire derrière la vignette sur le site postescanada.ca/150canada.

Le premier des 10 timbres sera dévoilé le 27 avril à Montréal. Les autres seront présentés individuellement sur cinq semaines; les deux derniers seront révélés le 1er juin. Ce jour-là, les 10 timbres PermanentsMC du régime intérieur seront offerts en différents formats. Il sera possible de se les procurer dans les bureaux de poste ou de les commander en ligne, par la poste ou par téléphone. Les clients peuvent également les précommander à l’avance sur le site postescanada.ca/150canada ou par téléphone.

Comme pour tous les timbres de Postes Canada, ces sujets ont été choisis par le Comité consultatif sur les timbres-poste de Postes Canada. Ce comité est composé de 12 membres du public, dont des historiens, des archivistes, des concepteurs, des philatélistes et d’autres experts qui sont tous des sommités dans leur domaine.

Vimy Ridge (World War I) (Canada 2017)

[press release]
New stamps to be issued with France mark 100th anniversary of Canadian sacrifice and victory in the Battle of Vimy Ridge
This significant First World War action was pivotal in our history

OTTAWA – On April 8, 2017, Canada Post will issue commemorative stamps to mark the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge, an impressive victory in the First World War that was a coming-of-age moment for Canada.

The joint issue with France will feature two stamps, one designed by Canada Post and the other by France’s La Poste, honouring the bond that the battle on French soil forged between the two nations.

At 5:30 a.m. on April 9, 1917, the first wave of soldiers in the nearly 100,000-strong Canadian Corps emerged from their muddy trenches. The Corps was ordered to seize a heavily fortified and strategic height of land, Vimy Ridge, in northern France. The ridge had been a virtually impregnable German-held position since early in the war and had withstood several previous assaults, at great cost to the Allies.

Advancing on the heels of a ferocious artillery barrage that pounded the German defences, the Canadians crossed a treacherous no man’s land, attacked up hill and played a vital role in helping Allied forces capture Vimy Ridge.

It was one of the most impressive Allied victories of the First World War – but it came at a heavy price. Nearly 3,600 Canadians were killed and more than 7,000 were wounded over four days of bitter fighting. The Canadian soldiers’ bravery, determination and skillful precision at Vimy earned Canada international accolades. To this day, the Battle of Vimy Ridge is considered by many to be one of the defining moments that helped to forge a proud, more independent identity for a nation that was still relatively young.

“The Battle of Vimy Ridge saw thousands of Canadians make the ultimate sacrifice and is the best-known chapter in our country’s proud First World War history,” says Deepak Chopra, President and CEO of Canada Post. “The valour of Canadians at Vimy a century ago is a poignant reminder of the enormous price paid so we can live in freedom.”

The Canadian stamp was designed by Susan Scott of Montréal and features the two towering pylons of Walter Allward’s Vimy monument, which represent France and Canada. The sheer scale of the monument reflects Canada’s important contribution to Allied victory in the First World War. In the foreground of the stamp is a figure of a grieving man, one of the monument’s statues, symbolizing loss and grief. The ridge behind the monument on the stamp recalls the site of the battle itself.

Also represented on the stamp are the thousands of names inscribed around the base of the monument. They are a memorial to all the Canadians who died in France during the First World War and had no known grave at the time. Laurel sprigs surrounding the monument’s two towers on the stamp represent the victory and tragic loss of life. A maple leaf on one sprig represents Canada, while an oak leaf on the other represents France.

The Canadian National Vimy Memorial was featured on a stamp Canada Post issued in 1968, commemorating the 50-year anniversary of the armistice that ended the First World War.

About the stamps
Available in a booklet of 10, the domestic rate stamps measure 41 mm x 30 mm and feature lithography in a four-colour process and two special inks. A Canada souvenir sheet at the Canadian international rate featuring two stamps – one designed by Canada and one by France – measures 130 mm x 85 mm and includes lithography and offset gravure printing. An official first day cover with a single domestic rate stamp and a joint official first day cover with both stamps at the Canadian international rate measure 190 mm x 112 mm and feature a four-colour process and one special ink.

Canada Post and France’s La Poste unveiled stamps to honour the Canadian soldiers who fought in the Battle of Vimy Ridge in 1917. His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada (left), was joined by Deepak Chopra, President and CEO of Canada Post, to unveil the Canadian stamp. France’s stamp was unveiled by His Excellency Nicolas Chapuis, Ambassador of France to Canada, and Benoît Georges, representative of La Poste for the Americas. Photo by Denis Drever\Canada Post.

En Francais:
Une émission conjointe avec la France souligne le centenaire de la victoire du Canada à Vimy et les sacrifices de nos soldats
Cette importante bataille de la Première Guerre mondiale est un événement charnière de notre histoire

OTTAWA – Le 8 avril 2017, Postes Canada émettra des timbres commémoratifs pour souligner le centenaire de la bataille de la crête de Vimy, une victoire remarquable qui donna au Canada son identité propre.

Cette émission conjointe du Canada et de la France est composée de deux timbres, l’un conçu par Postes Canada et l’autre par La Poste (France), pour illustrer le lien que ce combat en sol français a créé entre les deux nations.

À 5 h 30 le 9 avril 1917, la première vague des quelque 100 000 soldats canadiens sort des tranchées boueuses. Le corps d’armée doit prendre une partie stratégique très élevée et puissamment fortifiée du nord de la France, la crête de Vimy. Dès le début de la guerre, les Allemands avaient envahi cette position, la rendant quasi impénétrable. Elle avait déjà résisté à plusieurs assauts, forçant les alliés à combattre au prix de grands sacrifices.

Dans la foulée d’un terrible barrage d’artillerie qui a pilonné la défensive allemande, les soldats canadiens traversent une zone périlleuse, attaquent l’ennemi en amont et jouent un rôle primordial dans la prise de la crête de Vimy par les forces alliées.

Cette victoire est l’une des plus impressionnantes des forces alliées, mais le tribut payé est très lourd. En quatre jours de combat sans merci, près de 3 600 Canadiens sont tués et plus de 7 000 subissent des blessures. La bravoure, la détermination et la précision des soldats canadiens à Vimy ont valu au Canada les éloges du monde entier. À ce jour, la bataille de la crête de Vimy est considérée par plusieurs comme faisant partie des grands moments qui ont permis au Canada, encore relativement jeune, de se forger une identité distincte et empreinte de fierté.

« La bataille de la crête de Vimy a coûté la vie à des milliers de Canadiens et elle représente un volet incontournable du rôle de notre pays dans la Première Guerre mondiale, affirme Deepak Chopra, président-directeur général de Postes Canada. Le courage des Canadiens à Vimy il y a cent ans est un douloureux rappel de l’énorme prix payé pour la liberté. »

Le timbre Canadien, conçu par Susan Scott de Montréal, représente les deux colonnes jumelles du majestueux Mémorial national du Canada à Vimy, chef-d’œuvre de Walter Allward, qui représente la France et le Canada. La taille imposante du monument évoque l’importante contribution du Canada dans la victoire des alliés et la fin des combats de la Première Guerre mondiale. La vignette représente à l’avant-plan une des statues érigées sur le monument, celle d’un homme affligé symbolisant le deuil. Derrière le monument, la crête rappelle le site de la bataille.

Illustrés également sur le motif sont les milliers de noms gravés autour du monument, évoquant le souvenir de tous les Canadiens qui sont morts en France durant la Première Guerre mondiale et dont le lieu de sépulture est inconnu. Les branches de laurier qui forment un cercle devant les deux tours du monument représentent à la fois la victoire et la perte tragique de vies humaines. La feuille d’érable symbolise le Canada, alors que la feuille de chêne symbolise la France.

Postes Canada a émis en 1968 un timbre orné du Mémorial national du Canada à Vimy à l’occasion du 50e anniversaire de l’armistice qui a mis fin à la Première Guerre mondiale.

À propos des timbres
Proposés en carnets de 10, les timbres au tarif du régime intérieur mesurent 41 mm x 30 mm et sont lithographiés en quatre couleurs au moyen de deux encres spéciales. Un bloc-feuillet Canada au tarif du régime international en monnaie canadienne et composé des deux timbres – l’un conçu par le Canada et l’autre par la France – mesure 130 mm x 85 mm et il est imprimé selon les techniques de lithographie et d’héliogravure. Un pli Premier Jour officiel comportant un seul timbre au tarif du régime intérieur et un pli Premier Jour officiel conjoint comportant les deux timbres au tarif du régime international en monnaie canadienne mesurent 190 mm x 112 mm et sont imprimés en quadrichromie avec une encre spéciale.

Daisies (Canada 2017)

[press release]
Canada Post “picks” Daisies for 2017
Annual flower issue timed for spring and newlyweds OTTAWA Ð Once again, Canada Post will welcome spring and delight future newlyweds, gardeners and collectors with their annual spring flower issue. This year, the domestic-rate Permanent stamps will focus on two colourful varieties of daisies:

  • While named after a shoreline village in Ohio, the lakeside daisy is now almost exclusively found on southern Ontario’s Bruce Peninsula and Manitoulin Island. Designated “threatened” on both federal and provincial species-at-risk lists, the perennial plant thrives in development-prone areas of exposed bedrock with scant soil.
  • The usually lavender showy fleabane is found in wet meadows and open forests in higher elevation areas of British Columbia and Alberta.

For 2017, all stamp issues will include references to Canada’s sesquicentennial. For the Daisies issue, the words “Canada 150” are printed on the stamps in microtype. Due to the popularity of this issue for wedding invitations and stationery, the 26 mm (W) X 32 mm (H) stamps are available in booklets of 10 or coils of 50 — with the coil liner printed with the lyrics of Harry Dacre’s 1892 classic song, “Daisy, Daisy.” A two-stamp Souvenir Sheet, prepaid postcards of both designs and strips of four and 10 stamps from the coil are also available. An Official First Day cover featuring both stamps is canceled in Tobermory, Ontario. The stamps were designed and illustrated by Debbie Adams, of Adams + Associates Design Consultants Inc. and printed by the Lowe-Martin Group. The souvenir sheet The Official First Day Cover