Black History (Canada 2018)

From Details magazine:

Issued on the first day of Black History Month [February], these stamps recognize the contributions of two prominent, ground-breaking Canadians.

Kathleen (Kay) Livingstone (1918-75)
A long-time Toronto resident, Kathleen Livingstone was an activist, humanitarian and popular radio host devoted to the empowerment of Black women. She founded the Canadian Negro Women’s Association in the 1950s and, in 1975, launched the Congress of Black Women of Canada – now a nationwide organization. In 2011, she was named a Person of National Historic Significance by the Government of Canada.

“We are thrilled that people will learn not only about her efforts but also about the kind of person she was: a mother who served her family and a humanitarian who served her people, her city and her country,” says her daughter, Rene Livingstone. “She did it generously and she did it well.”

Lincoln M. Alexander (1922-2012)
Toronto-born Lincoln MacCauley Alexander had a distinguished career as a public servant and became a leader in the fight for racial equality. He was the first Black Canadian to be elected to the House of Commons (1968), appointed to the federal Cabinet (1979) and named to a viceregal position in Canada, as Lieutenant Governor of Ontario (1985). He encouraged countless young people to pursue their dreams – often telling them, “I did it. You can. You will.”

Both stamps, designed by Winnipeg-based Tétro, evoke the personal strength of these great Canadians through historic photographs. “The images selected capture a moment that is both internally reflective and formidable,” says designer Paul Tétrault. “The gold metallic glow pays tribute to their visionary influence and trailblazing achievements.”

[press release]
2018 Black History Month stamps celebrate trailblazers Lincoln M. Alexander and Kathleen (Kay) Livingstone
Two prominent Black Canadians devoted their lives to promoting equality and opportunity for everyone

OTTAWA, Jan. 26, 2018 /CNW/ – Canada Post is marking upcoming Black History Month with stamps for 2018 celebrating Lincoln M. Alexander and Kathleen (Kay) Livingstone, two prominent Black Canadians who shattered barriers for visible minorities in Canada. The stamps will be available for purchase at postal outlets and canadapost.ca/blackhistory beginning February 1, the start of Black History Month in Canada.

“Lincoln Alexander and Kay Livingstone opened countless doors for Black Canadians and other minorities across the country. They are remarkable role models who fostered Canadian values of diversity, respect and inclusion,” says Canada Post President and CEO Deepak Chopra.

Lincoln Alexander
Born in Toronto, Alexander (1922-2012) was a distinguished public servant who championed racial equality, justice and education in Canada for decades. He was the first Black Canadian to be elected to the House of Commons (1968), appointed to the federal cabinet (1979) and named to a viceregal position in Canada, as Lieutenant Governor of Ontario (1985). He encouraged countless youth to pursue their dreams, often telling them: “I did it. You can. You will.” In recognition of his extraordinary accomplishments, January 21 has been celebrated as Lincoln Alexander Day across Canada since 2015.

Kathleen (Kay) Livingstone
Raised in London, Ont., Livingstone (1918-75) lived most of her adult life in Toronto, where she was a popular radio host and became one of Canada’s most prominent visionaries, activists and humanitarians. She devoted her life to empowering Black women and is credited with coining the term “visible minority.” In the 1950s, she founded the Canadian Negro Women’s Association. In 1973, she organized the first National Congress of Black Women, and in 1975 launched the Congress of Black Women of Canada, a now nationwide organization dedicated to the welfare of Black women and their families. In 2011, she was named a Person of National Historic Significance by the Government of Canada.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *